Today I are bin mostly…

16 thoughts on “Today I are bin mostly…”

      1. I do know some people of colour who buy up this sort of stuff; partly to keep it out of the hands of racists, and partly so that there are collections so that in the future, there can be intelligent discussions about racist stereotypes in popular culture (i.e. when people talk about the ‘graciousness of the South’, stuff like this can be brought out).

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  1. Funny isn’t it just how much casual racism there was (is) and how it was just accepted as normal. Not just directed at black people. My old boss used to tell me about the “No dogs, No blacks, No Irish” signs in places when he was younger 70s/80s) and a friend of mine used to get dogs abuse for being a “paki”. Even though she was Indian *shakes head* . I have even had it down south being calles a “thick scotch c**t” and a “lazy jock” in a very thrreatening way and being told that I couldn’t spend Scottish money there. When we were cleaning out Mum’s loft she had a tin of paint from the 50’s that was labelled “N****r brown”. I couldn’t believe that that would have been acceptable ever. I am of Celtic descent so am so white I look blue so can’t comment on the blackface except to say how awful I think it is but have to add that a couple of my black friends (seems strange qualifying them that way as it never springs to mind ) would be fighting between themselves to get that tablecloth as they collect all that kitsch stuff. Thank heaven for more enlightened times. Actually, I might have to take that back. Post-Brexit Britain has clearly shown just how tolerant it is. That makes me angry and sad at the same time. Sorry for the semi-political rant. As they say up here we are all Jock Tamson’s bairns. Xx

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    1. I had a N brown dress, we had a cat called N when I was tiny [later re named Nidger which at least showed an attempt at sensitivity I suppose] many other things I could quote that make me cringe now. Sigh. Things ARE better now, but there’s a long way to go

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      1. I remember my mother eating black liquorice candies called n– babies. I think they still sell them, but call them liquorice babies now.

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  2. Thankfully we are all different. It would be very dull if we all thought alike – and we might all go in the wrong direction. Keep stirring the sh*t Fairy 😉
    (I have been trying to picture a KKK member in colourful garb 😂)

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  3. Oh my, that tablecloth made me wince! Can’t see how it could be seen as anything but racist and highly offensive. I well remember the things that Robinson’s jam gave away when I was a child (never ate enough jam to get one) and the Black and White Minstrel Show which was hugely popular in the 60s but, of course, is never amongst the old stuff they show on TV now. Sad to hear of your anti-Scottish abuse MoR. As someone who is (still) audibly Scottish even after 40 years in Greater Manchester, I can’t say I’ve ever heard any anti-Scottish sentiments here – maybe it’s the influence of Alex Ferguson that makes Mancs (well half of them) hold Scots in affection!

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  4. I wonder where the folks in the group were from. I’m not at all sure how the tablecloth would be perceived in other countries, but here in the US, it comes across as SUPER racist. Cripes, just the watermelon alone! I could see this popping up in one of my US-based sewing groups–it would probably be defended by a few older women who still cling to the “slaves were part of the family” fairy tale, but I would expect everybody else to see it as racist, even if they don’t all really understand why. It would sell quickly, though, to a collector of that stuff.

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    1. There seemed to be more US defenders on the textiles group…the UK groups were as you describe above. Not statistically significant of course, but what intrigues me is the wide-eyed, stubborn naivety of those who think it’s OK. Sigh. We’re a long way from where we need to be

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  5. I grew up in the 70’s and like everybody else, watched the ‘black and white minstrel show’ not to mention ‘love thy neighbour’, which would be viewed as deeply offensive now. Comedy was also ‘incorrect’ and when I listen to old radio shows such as ‘I’m sorry I haven’t a clue’ or ‘the Goons’ with their imitations of ‘black’ people, I do wince. Is today’s climate any better? I’m not so sure. The post-Brexit landscape is looking very hostile and the rise of alt+right is fuelling discontent.

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    1. I think that there are more people made uncomfortable by this sort of thing than not…although people will sometimes still casually use unacceptable terms, there are enough educators constantly calling them out on it, and leading them to the light. Brexit, UKIP, etc have brought the vocal minority out from under their rocks, but the more enlightened are also reacting. Unpleasant times everywhere, but I truly think America has it much, much worse right now…

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  6. I was surprised to recently discover that “eating watermelon” had racist connotations. I suppose because I am not from the U.S. it just appeared to me as someone eating a piece of fruit. So I do think where we live has something to do with what we perceive as being racist.

    Having said that, I was looking at an online fabric site recently where I saw a fabric colour described in what I thought could be considered a racist term, Not quite as bad as N brown but similar. I emailed the website and they apologised and removed the reference but I am pretty sure they would had no idea that it could be offensive.

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    1. This is why it’s important to draw people’s attention to it. We all use phrases we were brought up on without thinking at all, and without any intended insult. It’s important to educate one another, these tiny steps improve the world.

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  7. It looked better when I didn’t have my reading glasses on… just a blur of border and flowers. “can’t be slaves because they are happy and well dressed”? Do you actually think they would make a tablecloth with half naked, beaten, emancipated, chained and shackled black people on it? Of course they were pictured happy and well dressed!

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